Guinea Pig Food Chart

Click on the link for each food to find out more about it.

Daily Every Other Day 3-4 Times a Week 2-3 times a Week 1-2 times a Week Once a Month
Food Contents Amount Given
Alfafa Alfalfa hay is too rich in calcium and minerals to be fed consistently. Babies under 6 months and pregnant females can have it for extra protein Feed Sparingly
Alfafa Sprouts High in calcium. Once or twice a week in small amounts.
Artichoke Globe. NOT JERUSALEM OR CHINESE ARTICHOKE Globe artichokes: Low in vitamin c. High in acid and phosphorus. Feed light green and white leaves, remove outer leaves. Globe artichokes can be eaten one to two times a week in small amounts.
Arugula High in calcium. With good amount of vitamin c. Can be fed every other day in moderate amounts
Apple Small amount of calcium and vitamin c. High in sugar. Apple seeds are poisonous. Given in small amounts once or twice a week. Can eat peelings in small amounts.
Apricots High in sugar. Can only be fed one or two times a week in small slices.
Asparagus Moderate amount of vitamin C. Low in phosphorus, calcium and sugar. High in nutrients. Feed one to two times a week.
Bamboo High in fiber, water and vitamin c. Excellent for guinea pigs! They can eat the leaves and stalks. Can have daily in moderate amounts.
Banana Guinea pigs can eat bananas, leaves and skin! Banana is high is sugar and low in calcium and vitamin c. Peel is high in phosphorus, potassium, iron, vitamin a and protein. Small slices once or twice a month. Peel should be a rare treat. Not a lot is currently known about the banana leaf, but guinea pigs have been known to love it. Feed carefully.
Basil High calcium and phosphorous levels Feed once or twice a week.
Bean Sprouts Good vitamin c and calcium levels. Should be fed in moderation. Once or twice a week is enough.
Belgian Endives Low in phosphorus, calcium, vitamin c and sugar. They can have almost daily in moderate amounts.
Beet leaves High in calcium and oxalates. Once a month! No more than this.
Beets/Beetroot/Red beet Small amount of phosphorus and calcium. High in fat and sugar. Leaves can be poisonous as they are high in oxalates vitamin a and calcium. Stem contains high levels of calcium and oxalate. Causes unharmful pink stools and urine. Once or twice a week. Stem can be fed in tiny bits, sparingly.
Blackberries Excellent vitamin C levels with small amount of fat, calcium and high sugar content. Blackberry Leaves are fine to give Give in small amounts, two to three times a week. Leaves in moderate amounts
Blueberries Good amount of vitamin c. High in sugar. In small amounts, as in one or two each, twice a week at the most.
Bok Choy High in calcium. Fed one to two times a week in small amounts.
Broccolini High in vitamin c, vitamin a, calcium, iron and folate. One to two times a week sparingly.
Broccoli High in calcium vitamin a and vitamin c. One to two times a week in small amounts, large amounts will make your guinea pigs gassy.
Brussel Sprouts They can eat the stalks and leaves. High in vitamin c, sugar, phosphorus and oxelate acid. Only one to two times per week in moderate amounts.
Red Cabbage

Green Cabbage

Green cabbage: can make guinea pigs gassy and bloated. Red cabbage: has fantastic amount of vitamin c with a tiny amount of calcium, fat and sugar. Really good for them.
Green Cabbage: Use sparingly and only one to two times a week. Red Cabbage: Can have every other day in moderate amounts!
Capsicums Green/Yellow/Red peppers or capsicums Not the stems or seeds as these are hard to bite through. Fantastic vitamin c amount! Green peppers are the best. Orange, Yellow and Red capsicums are a bit higher in sugar.  Green: Can have a quarter daily.

Yellow/Orange/Red: Quarter every second day.

Carrot Carrots are a wonderful food for your guinea pig as they can have the skin, tops and all. One baby carrot per day is enough.
Cauliflower They can eat the leaves and heads Give in tiny bits one to two times per week is enough.
Celeriac This contains a large amount of phosphorus and potassium. A small amount of vitamin a and sugar. Feed once a week in small amounts.
Celery Can cause bloating if fed in large amounts. It is stringy, so it should be cut up in thin slices to avoid choking hazards. Can be fed two to four times a week in small amounts.
Chard All the different kinds of chard are fantastic for guinea pigs. Can be fed every other day in moderate amounts.
Cherries Good amount of vitamin c. High in sugar. Cut out the stem and stone. One to two times a week in small amounts.
Cherry Tomatoes Very good for guinea pigs. They can have one or two per day.
Chickweed Every other day in small amounts
Chicory Good amount of vitamin c. Moderate amounts of phosphorus and calcium with some fat and sugar. Once or twice a week
Cilantro Cilantro is very good for guinea pigs. They can eat flowers leaves and stems. Great vitamin c levels with some phosphorus, calcium and a bit of sugar, oxelate and fat. Can have every other day in moderate amounts or a bit each day in smaller amounts.
Clover Good for them. Moderate amount each day.
Collard Greens High amount of calcium and vitamin c. Once a week at the most
Courgette Same as zucchini: Leaves, uncooked zucchini spaghetti and the zucchini itself are all great for guinea pigs. They can have a moderate amount daily.
Coriander Can eat leaves and stalks. Excellent vitamin c levels. Can be fed every other day in moderate amounts.
Cornflakes High in sugar. Small once a month treat! No more then this.
Cucumber All parts can be eaten. High in water content. Small amount of vitamin c. Feed every other day, shouldn’t be a daily treat.
Dandylion Leaves and Flowers Leaves, stems and flowers are fine. Can be fed daily, but in moderate amounts
Dill High calcium and phosphorus content. Feed in small amounts once or twice a month.
Eggplant High in potassium, phosphorus. Low vitamin c. Feed in moderation once or twice a week.
Endive Great for guinea pigs. High vitamins and minerals with low phosphorus, calcium and sugar. Can be fed every second day.
Fig

Dried Figs

High in sugar, low fat and calcium. Dried figs have less sugar. Once a week in small amount. Dried figs can be given 3-4 times a week in moderation.
Fine beans/ Green beans

Lima Beans
Edamame Beans
Broad Beans
NOT KIDNEY BEANS or RUNNER BEANS.

Fine Beans/Green beans: Can eat leaves as well as beans. Medium amount of phosphorus and calcium with good vitamin c. Seeds are poisonous.
Lima beans: high phosphorus, low calcium and sugar.
Edamame beans: high phosphorus. Low in calcium, fat and sugar.
Broad Beans: Low calcium, fat, sugar and vitamin c.
Fine Beans/Green Beans: Once a week is plenty but in moderation.

Lima beans: Once a week in small amounts.

Edamame beans: Once a month in small amounts. Caution, shells are tough to chew.

Broad Beans: Can have two to three times a week in moderation.

Gooseberries Acidic with calcium, phosphorus and a good amount of vitamin c. Once a week in moderation
Grapefruit/Red and Pink Guinea pigs can eat the peel and fruit. High in sugar and vitamin c. Once a month sparingly
Grapes Seedless grapes only. Low in vitamin c and high in sugar. Only two to three times a week at the most, one or two at a time cut in half.
Raisins High in sugar. One or two as a treat every two weeks.
Grass Great for the digestive system! As much as they want!
Kale Contains a bit of oxelate, phosphorus, calcium and huge amount of vitamin c. Only once a week in small amounts.
Kiwifruit Can eat skin, seeds and fruit. High in sugar and vitamin c. They can have once a week in small amounts.
Lemon Very acidic, high in sugar and vitamin c. Once a month sparingly.
Lettuce Not Iceberg type.

Green Leaf Lettuce
All other kinds

Iceberg lettuce is a big NO!

Butter head lettuce- Small amount of vitamin c, calcium, phosphorus, fat, sugar and a little acidic.

Green Leaf Lettuce- High in vitamin c, low in phosphorus, acid and calcium.

Red Leaf Lettuce: Hint of vitamin c, small amount of phosphorus, calcium and a hint of vitamin c.

Green Leaf lettuce- small handful every other day. All Other kinds- two to three times a week in moderate amounts.
Mandarin Can eat the skin as well as the fruit! Seeds should be removed. High sugar and acidic content with fantastic vitamin c levels. They can have one segment each, (with or without peel) once or twice a week.
Mango Not the seeds or skin. Can eat leaves. High levels of sugar and vitamin c. Feed in small amounts once or twice a week.
Melon Guinea pigs can eat the skin but scoop out the seeds. High in sugar and water content, low in vitamins. Give one quarter once or twice a week at the most.
Mint High in calcium. One leaf each. Once a week.
Mustard greens Moderate amount of vitamin c and calcium, small amount of phosphorus, sugar, fat and acid. One to two times per week in moderate amounts.
Orange Can eat fruit, peel and leaves. High vitamin c and sugar content. Can have orange fruit once or twice a week one segment per pig. The peel they can have two to four times a week in small amounts.
Pak Choy High in calcium, vitamin c and a. Once or twice a week sparingly.
Parsley Can eat leaves and stems. High in vitamin c. Moderate calcium levels. Once or twice a week in moderate amounts.
Parsnips High in phosphorus and potassium. Bit of calcium and a tiny amount of sugar and fat. Moderate amount of vitamin c. One to two times per week as a tiny piece each.
Pea pods and Peas They can have snow peas, sugar snaps and other types of peas, shoots, stems but NOT SPLIT PEAS Contain phosphorus, sugar, calcium, acid, fat and vitamin c! Two to four times a week in moderation.
Pear Cut away the core but leave the skin. High in sugar and acid. Good vitamin c amount. Give in small amounts once or twice a week.
Plantin High in sugar with phosphorus and calcium. Tiny piece once a month! Rare treat.
Pumpkin Can eat the skin, rind and leaves. Leaves are high in calcium. Pumpkin has sugar, phosphorus, oxelate acid, and sugar. High vitamin a and low vitamin c. Only small chunks once or twice a week. Leaves must be fed in tiny amounts.
Radishes and Leaves Radishes have phosphorus, calcium, fat and are high in sugar and acids. Leaves are very good for guinea pigs. Radishes can be fed twice a month sparingly. Leaves can be fed in moderate amounts every other day.
Raspberries and Leaves Can eat both leaves and fruit. A little sugar, phosphorus, calcium, fat, sugar and acid. Good vitamin c content. Raspberries one to two times a week. Leaves can be fed almost daily in small amounts.
Rocket High in calcium and vitamin a. Feed one to two times a week in moderation.
Spinach Can eat leaves NOT stalks High in vitamin c, calcium, oxalates and low in sugar. One to two times per week in small amounts
Silver beet (Same as chard) Every other day in moderate amounts.
Swede High in sugar, calcium and phosphorus. Moderate amount Small piece once a week as a treat.
Sweet Potatoes Can eat leaves as well. Any other potato is toxic. Contains starch, phosphorus, fat and oxalate acid. Leaves are high in acid, low in phosphorus, fat and calcium. Once or twice a month. Leaves can be given one to two times a week.
Squash Guinea pigs can eat all kinds of squash. Acorn squash is the best. Tiny bit of calcium and lots of good vitamin c!
Butternut squash- High vitamin c, vitamin a and fibre. Low in phosphorus and calcium.
Generally two to three times a week in moderation. Acorn squash- three to four times a week in moderation.
Butternut squash- one to two times a week.
Strawberries They can eat the fruit, tops, leaves and stems. High in sugar. Acidic. Leaves are good for guinea pigs. One strawberry per pig once a week is enough.
Tangerine Can eat fruit and peel. High in sugar and acid, low in phosphorus, calcium and fat. Good vitamin c. Once or twice a week, half a slice each.
Tomatoes Cannot eat stalks, vines or leaves. Green tomatoes are poisonous. Red tomatoes Low in sugar, phosphorus and fat. Great vitamin c. Red tomatoes should be given no more than a quarter each twice a week.
Turnip High in sugar and oxalates. Turnip leaves are high in acid, calcium, vitamin c and phosphorus. Feed once or twice a week in moderation. The turnip greens should be fed once a week at the most.
Water Cress Good vitamin c content. Once or twice per week in small amounts.
Water Melon NOT the skin. Low in vitamins, high in sugar. Scoop out seeds. Can be fed every other day in small amounts. The rind can be fed once a week as a tiny bit for a treat.
Wheat grass Really good for guinea pigs. They can have as much as they want!
Yams Large amount of potassium and vitamin c. Feed two to three times a week in small amounts.
Zucchini Leaves, skin, uncooked zucchini spaghetti golden zucchini and the zucchini itself are all great for guinea pigs. Good amount of vitamin c They can have a moderate amount every day.

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4 thoughts on “Guinea Pig Food Chart

  • August 31, 2016 at 5:09 pm
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    I was looking for a place just to make a general comment so I’ve had a pretty good look at most of your site and all i can say is, “wow” , this is looking pretty awesome and comprehensive. And, yes, the research into a topic like this is extensive but you’ve got this. What you have so far looks great. I’m not much into Guinea Pigs but they are cute and like you said, if you treat your pets well you have a best friend for life and, that goes for any pet. They need love and care just like us humans do.

    Good for you, Emma. You Rock!

    Wayne

    Reply
    • November 11, 2016 at 1:08 am
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      Thank you so much Wayne! I have often wondered “what can I feed my guinea pigs?” and then decided to put together a list that people can look up when they want to find a certain food. If you cannot find anything, let me know and I will tell you whether it is safe to feed or not!

      Reply
  • February 10, 2017 at 1:25 am
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    Can Guinea Pigs eat Chives?

    Reply
    • February 10, 2017 at 3:17 am
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      Chives have quite a lot of vitamin c in them so they can have a couple of stalks once or twice a week but be careful because they also have a bit of calcium and sugar etc. 😀 Good on you for checking! I didn’t know they could eat chives either until I looked it up!

      Reply

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