Guinea Pig Cages

Personally I’ve never liked the word “cage.” It reminds one of a small, enclosed area with bars and I don’t think that sounds right. Do you? I prefer to use the word “enclosure.” It reminds one of a large space with room for adventure, a bit like the zoo! Wouldn’t that be wonderful! A whole enclosure dedicated to guinea pigs! Well, at least I think so!

First of all let me remind you that the size requirements for a cage is: two guinea pigs:  7.5 square feet (minimum), but 10.5 square feet is preferred; generally 30″ x 50.″

Anyway, here are some guinea pig cages that you can try making!


 C&C Cage

Guinea pig cagesC&C Cages have become hugely popular in the last few years as they can be custom built into any shape and style that you want! They were first designed by Teresa Murphy and have since taken off at the huge level! They are made with wire cube shelving grids linked together using coroplast as a base. You can generally find these materials at any home or department store.

Coroplast is also known as coroflute or Coroplast, FlutePlast, IntePro, Proplex, Correx, Twinplast, Corriflute or Corflute. It is like corrugated cardboard except plastic and is easy to cut and bend.

You will need

First of all lay the grids down side by side and tie them together with the zip ties. Bend them into a rectangle and measure the coroplast with enough to fit around the sides. Now you will need to cut the coroplast to size.

Adding fixtures

C&C cages must be long, not wide but can have a loft with a ramp. I highly recommend these as my guinea pigs simply loved running up and down the ramp to the next level! All you need to do is zip tie two more grids on top and four on each side to form a second level! Extra coroplast, if there is enough leftover, can be shaped into a ramp! Make sure that it is not too steep. Trail some grass up the ramp and our guinea pigs will quickly learn how to get up it!


Midwest cages

Midwest cages are only brilliant in a fact that they can be connected up together to form one big cage! In this cage you will have to buy two, not one. The ramps have to be covered because wire is sore on a guinea pigs feet. The bottom is made of canvas and is completely washable and reusable. You will need to make sure that you cover it up because guinea pigs have a tenancy to chew on the sides!


Swimming Pool Cage

When you need to be inventive there are all sorts of things you can come up with! Swimming pools are one of them!

In fact, I have actually heard of people who brought them as a cage or a playpen. Make sure you measure out the dimensions of the space and work out what will fit in your house. Double check these measurements before you buy your pool!

Note: If you have dogs or cats it is so important to either make a cage cover or make the guinea pig room out-of-bounds! Even if you trust your moggies, you can never be too careful!


iconSandpits

Plastic sandpits could be a perfect idea for a cage! They need to have sides that are high enough to prevent guinea pigs from jumping out and be wide enough to allow them room to run around in.

The base can be as easy as a plastic sheet or a shower curtain tucked around the edges of the sides. Make sure to cover the base well with towels and fleece or whatever you will be suing as your bedding because guinea pigs love to chew!


Notes

guinea-pig-cagesOther animals: It is always essential if there are other loose animals in the house that the cage, whatever you decide to use is covered and secured.

Water bottle: Wooden or plastic sided cages may not have a place for the water bottle to hang, so you must improvise and design a fixture that will securely hold the water bottle within reach.

Base: When using a playpen or sandbox, or perhaps your own design, you will need a base. Shower curtains are widely used in the place of coroplast as they are reusable, replaceable, waterproof and easy to cut to shape. Just make sure that your piggies cannot chew on the edges.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)